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Complete Portfolio with 15 Original photographs: “Selection Esther Woerdehoff”, 1947-2007. Magnum Photographs.

Gelatin silver prints and Chromogenic prints. Printed later, in 2007. Each signed, numbered, with magnum stamps Number 6 from an edition of 7. Published by Galerie Esther Woerdehoff in Paris. Diverse sizes from 28 x 35,5 cm to 40 x 50 cm (diverse formats) In original blue box ‘Burkhardt AG’, each photograph under passepartout. Provenance: Galerie Esther Woedehoff, Paris Private collection, France 1. WERNER BISCHOF (1916-1954). Courtyard Meiji Temple, Tokyo, Japan, 1951. Gelatin silver print. 33,5 x 28 cm. With an estate stamp on the reverse. 2. ELLIOTT ERWITT (1928). Detroit Potwups,USA, 1962. Gelatin silver print. 20 x 30,5 cm. Signed, inscribed and dated by the artist on the reverse. 3. CHRIS STEELE-PERKINS (1947). London Zoo, 1973. Gelatin silver print. 26 x 36 cm. Signed by the artist on the reverse. 4. MARC RIBOUD (1923-2016). Washington, 1967. Gelatin silver print. 24 x 36,3 cm. Signed at lower right. With a photographer’s stamp with address, 48, rue monsieur le prince, 75006 paris, tél. 46 34 23 59 - fax 40 51 05 19“ and with Magnum stamp and number on the reverse. 5. DENNIS STOCK (1928-2010). James Dean, USA, NYC, 1955. Gelatin silver print. 37,3 x 26,2 cm. Photographer’s stamp at lower right. 6. JALAI ABBAS (1944-2018). Afgahnistan, [19]92. Gelatin silver print. 24 x 36,3 cm. Artist’s blindstamp at lower right, signed ‘Abbas’, inscribed and dated on the reverse, with Magnum stamp, numbered. 7. PINKHASSOV GUERGUI (1952). The new metro, Japan, Tokyo, 1996. C-Print. 37 x 25 cm. Signed by the artist on the reverse. 8. CONSTANTINE MANOS (1934). New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, 1982. C-Print. 26 x 39,3 cm. Signed by the artist at lower right and on the reverse with Magnum stamp, numbered. 9. RENÉ BURRI (1933-2014). Rio de Janeiro, Brézil 1960. Gelatin silver print. 36 x 24 cm. Signed, inscribed and dated by the artist on the reverse. 10. HIROJI KUBOTA (1939). Guangxi, Yangshuo, China, 1980. C-Print in colors on Fuji Paper. 11,5 x 36 cm. Signed by the artist at lower right. 11. STEVE MCCURRY (1950). Sharbat Gula, Afghan Girl, Pakistan, 1984. C-Print. 35,5 x 23,5 cm. Fully signed by the artist on the reverse, with studio stamp, dated, inventory number. 12. FERDINANDO SCIANNA (1943). Nanà in Bed, Almeria, Spanien, 2002. Gelatin silver print. 24,5 x 35,5 cm. Signed by the artist on the reverse. 13. LARRY TOWELL (1953). Gaza Israel, 1993. Gelatin silver print. 25,5 x 31 cm. Fully signed by the artist on the reverse, inscribed and dated, magnum stamp, numbered. 14. SUSAN MEISELAS (1948). Mistress Catherine, the Versailles room, NY for Pandora‘s Box, 1995“. C-Print. 25,5 x 38,5 cm. Fully signed by the artist on reverse, inscribed, numbered 6/7 and dated. 15. THOMAS DWORZAK (1972). Russia, Chechnya, Grozny, 2/2002. Chechen Girl avoidet the rubble of the destroyed city center“. C-Print. 24,5 x 37 cm. Fully signed by the artist on the reverse, inscribed, with magnum stamp, numbered. STEVE MCCURRY (1950). Sharbat Gula, Afghan Girl, Pakistan, 1984: The photojournalist McCurry took this portrait picture of Sharbata Gula (ca. 1972) for the National Geographic, where it appeared on the cover in 1985. The photograph was taken in a refugee camp in Peshawar during the Soviet Occupation of Afghanistan, and the identity of this 12-year-old orphan remained unknown for many years, until the National Geographic itself organised an expedition to find out who the girl was and whether she was still alive. The artist had the chance to photograph her again after 17 years. Her expressive green and icy eyes became the emblem of refugee women all over the world, inspiring the compassion of many. Winner of numerous awards, McCurry has been a Magnum Photos collaborator since 1986. He studied photography at the Penn State University, starting his career at the university’s Daily Collegian. He worked in India for a while and then went to Pakistan, where he managed to cross the Afghanistan borders just before the invasion. He risked his life many times during his photo reportages in this and many other occasions. His “Afghan Girl” has become the “most recognized photograph» in the history the National Geographic.